Netflix’s Midnight Mass – Miniseries Review

[This is a summary review. For an episode-by-episode review, visit The Book Dragon.]

I devoured The Haunting of Hill House and The Haunting of Bly Manor as soon as they both came out. Both of those miniseries were the perfect blend of horror and aesthetics. People can complain all they want about how The Haunting of Hill House butchered Shirly Jackson’s masterpiece or how The Haunting of Bly Manor was more drama than horror. But I believe they were both amazing works of art that have great entertainment value.

The moment I heard about Midnight Mass I couldn’t wait for it. The teaser was brilliantly done and left me super curious. I was hoping to devour it all in one sitting, binge-watch it much the same way I’d done with the previous two Flanagan masterpieces. But I was forced to take my time with this one. And I’m glad I did.

An isolated island community experiences miraculous events – and frightening omens – after the arrival of a charismatic, mysterious young priest.

Everything about Midnight Mass is so on point. The cinematography, the casting, the aesthetics! Hamish Linklater, as Father Paul, delivers an amazing performance, brilliantly sinister. Kate Siegel is, as always, wonderful in her role as Erin Greene, an island returnee whose pregnancy is cause for rumors. Rohul Kohli as Sheriff Hassan, the only Muslim (apart from his son) on the island, timidly holds on to his authority – which is always under fire from Samantha Sloyan‘s Bev Keane, a horrid sycophant and easy to hate.

It’s definitely a slow burn, not as slow as Hill House. It definitely has drama much like Bly Manor. But I feel like Midnight Mass is a perfect balance of elements. The drama and the horror blend together quite seamlessly. Wonderfully done by the Flanagang.

Saba T. Siddiqui

A nerd who loves reading, writing, and disagreeing with people simply because I can.